THE PROGRAM!


As always, we seek to explore who sets the agenda, what changes the playing field and how we all can shape society from now on.

We still have lots of more cool stuff to unveil but now you can take a peek at the first edition of the program below. It will be updated continuously as we reveal more speakers – so do check in once in a while!


Tuesday August 27, 2019

8:00 am - 9:30 am

Coffee and registration

A lighter breakfast, lots of coffee and time to say hi to new and old friends!

9:30 am - 10:40 am

The Pioneering Grandmothers of the Internet

A journey through the untold stories of the web and the alternative futures that could have been.

The history of technology is one of men and machines – but female visionaries have always been at the vanguard of technology and innovation, they’ve just been erased from the story. Until now.

Claire L. Evans, musician, sci-fi editor, artist and author of Broadband will take us on a journey of the untold stories of the web. The stories of the ”tech mothers and grandmothers” and the alternative futures that could have been, many of which feels super contemporary today.

More info
11:00 am - 12:00 pm

Look Back, Move Forward

The unintended impacts of technology and solutions from the past.

Have we lost track of history? This session is by no means a conservative flirt. Rather, we want to explore what role history can (and do) play outside of the history books. Is the next solution always better than the previous one?

In this session, we’ll explore the unintended impacts of technology, alternative futures as well as solutions from the past that might be worth to revisit.

Speaking:

Zara Rahman, researcher and writer, The Engine Room

Zara will talk about pivotal moments that had knock-on effects on how we use technology in the world today. Could things be different if we had made other decisions in the past?

Kris De Decker, journalist & founder, Low tech magazine

Kris is all about low-tech solutions to high-tech problems. In his talk, he’ll revisit energy solutions from the past that could be worth considering today.

One more speaker to be announced.

More info
11:00 am - 12:00 pm

Out of Cash

On the brink of a cashless society.

“Sorry, we don’t accept cash”. The Nordics are a handful of countries on a fast track to becoming cashless societies, well in advance compared to other countries. One study even predicts that cash will be more or less useless in Sweden only five years from now. How did we get here so fast, and what will a world without bills and coins look like? Dive into the future of payments as we take a closer look at programmable money, crypto vs. e-currencies, and hear the case for protecting good old cash.

Speaking:

Jonas Hedman, Professor, Copenhagen Business School

In his talk, Jonas will explain how cash is disappearing, and foresee a new type of money: one that is intelligent and can be programmed for specific uses.

Brett Scott, author and economic hacker

Brett explores the intersections between money systems, finance, digital technology and cities. He will talk about why it’s important for us to protect cash.

One more speaker to be announced.

More info
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm

Lunch

1:00 pm - 2:00 pm

AI, Creativity and... All That Jazz!

How can we frame AI research to inspire, challenge and provoke human creative activity rather than replace it?

Mark d’Inverno is Professor of Computer Science at Goldsmiths, University of London, investigating the relationship between AI, technology and creativity.

Mark is also a critically acclaimed jazz pianist. In his academic research he combines both his creative practice and his scientific research investigates the future of human/machine collaboration. This is interdisciplinary research covering philosophy, psychology and AI first asking what is creative activity? And then asking how can we frame AI research to inspire, challenge and provoke human creative activity rather than replace it?

More info
2:15 pm - 3:15 pm

Say my name, say my name

Voice technology and interface expectations.

With home assistants like Alexa and Google home rapidly becoming household products throughout the developed world, voice technology is the next frontier to master. Just like with VR, it’s been around for quite some time, but as adoption grows, the glitches become evident. As an interface, voice differs a lot from screens and poses new challenges for designers and developers everywhere.

With a decade of responsive screens we’re used to having our gadgets perform as expected. And patience... well let’s just say it’s not a super compatible trait when it comes to tech performance. What are the challenges and opportunities of voice? How do we make it more human and interactive? And what are the possibilities beyond voice assistants?

Speaking

Nicole He, programmer & artist

Nicole He is a programmer, artist, and game developer based in Brooklyn, New York who uses digital and physical mediums to explore the relationship between humans and computers with interactivity, playfulness, and humor.

Two more speakers to be announced!

Speakers

Speaking: Nicole He
More info
2:15 pm - 3:15 pm

The Art of Maintenance

In the strive for circular, maintenance is finally making a comeback.

Innovation is fun, cherished and vital. Maintenance, on the other hand, has for long been regarded as something on the other side of the spectrum. But in the current heyday of sustainability and circularity, maintenance is finally having a comeback. Zero waste! Repair movements! Systems thinking! When new infrastructures are adopted, what kinds of networks, organisations and enterprises spring up to take care of them?

What we create needs to be maintained – regardless of whether it's physical or digital. This goes for our cities, our products, our systems, ourselves.

Speaking:

Lara Houston, Researcher, Goldsmiths

Should repair become an action that consumers have a “right” to pursue? Lara will present her research on breakdown, maintenance and repair, and why it matters.

Paul Soulellis, artist, Library of the Printed Web

Who decides what information to maintain and preserve? Paul uses publishing as a form of resistance and will take us on a journey through discarded documents online as well as offline.

One more speaker to be announced.

More info
3:15 pm - 4:00 pm

Snack time!

4:00 pm - 5:00 pm

Consumerism – drowning in stuff

More information coming soon!

4:00 pm - 5:00 pm

Under measure – making sense of numbers

More information coming soon!

5:15 pm - 6:00 pm

TBA

More information coming soon!

Wednesday August 28, 2019

8:30 am - 9:30 am

Coffee and croissants!

9:30 am - 10:40 am

Teaching Machines

A history of the century-old belief that the automation of education is necessary. But is it?

Audrey Watters is a writer and independent scholar who focuses on education technology, both in regards to its politics and its pedagogical implications. The EdTech industry predates the computer by several decades and although technology is getting more refined, the solutions echoes to this day.

Audrey has written for The Baffler, The Atlantic, Vice, Inside Higher Ed and elsewhere across the web. She is best known for her Hack Education website where she has been tracking the development of EdTech since 2010. She is the author of several books, including The Monsters of Education Technology series and is currently working on her next book, Teaching Machines, which will be published by MIT Press. Audrey was a recipient of the Spencer Education Journalism Fellowship at Columbia University for the 2017-2018 academic year.

More info
11:00 am - 12:00 pm

Playing with Biology

A look at pioneering projects mixing technology and biological materials.

As we learned at last year’s The Conference, humans have been trying to design nature for ages. With ever more refined technologies such as CRISPR, what is possible expands super quick, to the point that we have to pinch ourselves to believe what we see.

This year we’ll take a look at pioneering projects mixing technology and biological materials. How about food teleportation or using your house plants as extra file storage? No, we’re not kidding you, the times ahead are just that weird and exciting!

Ryosuke Sakaki & Takashi Koyama, founder & partner, Open meals Ryosuke and Takashi are working on reproducing food from data to establish a digital open food network. On stage they’ll share their work on 3D printed food and “Sushi teleportation”.

Monika Seyfried & Cyrus Clarke, Grow your own cloud Researcher and artist, Monika and Cyrus, will showcase their joint project Grow your own cloud, a service that helps you store your data in the DNA of plants.

More speakers to be announced.

More info
11:00 am - 12:00 pm

Hacking Democracy

Can we hack and reinvent how a democracy works to restore trust and welfare in a post-industrial world?

All over the world, the idea of democracy is under threat. Standard democratic rights such as free press or women’s right to abortion are being undermined in several countries. The large majority of people in highly developed countries do not believe that the next generation will be more prosperous than the current one. Populations in democratic states feel increasingly left out and let down by society, with populist and extremist parties on the rise as a result. What is going on, and can we hack and reinvent how a democracy works to restore trust and welfare in a post-industrial world?

Speaking:

Maria Mahlo, (M.Soc.Sc.) expert in societal transformations, Demos Helsinki.

Many Scandinavian countries are based on the notion of universalism, but what does that mean today? Maria will talk about universalism in a new era, moving beyond concepts such as universal basic income and present an idea on how society can rethink how we distribute services and assets to create more equal societies.

More speakers to be announced.

More info
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm

Lunch

1:00 pm - 2:00 pm

Creating the New Social Web

Ideas and infrastructures for diverse and sustainable communities.

The initial vision of the web was to create a decentralized infrastructure where people could connect and interact with each other around the world. Today, very few players control the majority of the web traffic, with business models that are incentivising us to spend more time on those platforms. As a response to the critique of the major platforms, a new battery of players are building social networks and platforms with a very different agenda: to create a digital infrastructure for diverse and sustainable communities.

Speakers to be announced!

This session is curated, but not sponsored by, our friends from Co-matter.

More info
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm

Deepfakes – not based on a true story

We are on the verge of not being able to tell what is real anymore, so how do we protect the truth?

AI-assisted fake videos are getting eerily real. The term “deepfake” emerged only two years ago to describe how deep learning technologies applied to video create stunningly realistic images of situations that… never happened. We are on the verge of not being able to tell what is real anymore, so how do we protect the truth? And, more importantly, how will we be able to spot a computer-generated fake video or voice in a sea of information?

Let’s go deep into the land of fake – the fast tech advances on audiovisual forgery, problems that might arise from it, what has already happened, and what is being done to combat malicious deepfake material.

Speaking:

Sam Gregory is Program Director of WITNESS which supports anyone, anywhere to use video and technology to fight for human rights. He leads work around opportunities and threats including artificial intelligence, deepfakes and challenges to trust and evidence.

Giorgio Patrini is CEO and Chief Scientist at Deeptrace, an Amsterdam-based startup building deep learning technology for detecting and understanding fake videos.

More info
2:15 pm - 3:15 pm

Tomorrow's Story

How to research it, how to tell it, how to fund it.

Today’s newsroom is in transformation. Older trusted models of storytelling and financing journalistic work are being challenged and replaced with new methods of finding stories, innovative storytelling formats and new ideas in funding. We look at three different ways of creating the news of tomorrow with small data, creative use of video and finding a business model beyond paywalls and traditional advertising.

Speaking:

Dr. Bahareh Heravi, Assistant Professor, University College Dublin

Dr. Bahareh Heravi is a Data and Computational Journalism researcher and innovator who shows how any newsroom can work with small data in research.

Natalie Remoe Hansen & Kristoffer Kumar, Video Journalists, Verdens Gang

The journalistic team from Verdens Gang takes us behind the scenes of the internationally recognized story “The Tinder Swindler”, using innovative mobile storytelling that went viral.

One more speaker to be announced.

More info
2:15 pm - 3:15 pm

TBA

More information coming soon!

3:15 pm - 4:00 pm

Snack time!

4:00 pm - 5:00 pm

What's outside the universe?

An exploration on the edges of knowledge.

Our universe is bizarre. Why is most of the cosmos composed of mysterious dark matter? Why is the Higgs boson so strange? Why do atoms exist? The hottest-and-latest in physics suggests that the biggest puzzles of science could be elegantly solved if our universe were one of a possibly infinite number of universes. But is this a testable scientific idea, or eternally speculative? How do we talk about what's outside our universe?

Join Dr. James Beacham, of CERN's Large Hadron Collider, as he explores the edges of knowledge -- including CERN's plans for a colossal Future Circular Collider -- and how the future of science, technology, and innovation will be much wilder than we can imagine.

More info
5:00 pm - 7:00 pm

After Conference

Hugs, drinks and casual contemplation.